Kristine Chong (she/her/hers), a 2nd generation Korean American chaplain and activist, is the online editor for Inheritance. A former organizer, service provider, researcher, and community facilitator, Kristine’s ethos of spiritual care is rooted in the interconnectedness of spiritual and social change. Her praxis of care integrates ethics of liberationist, postcolonial, anticapitalist, and ecofeminist aims. She is a graduate of Union Theological Seminary (MDiv), University of Michigan (MPP), and UCLA (BA).

Practicing Daily Resurrection During the End of the World
By Kristine Chong

I am reminded that a world anew, already in motion, is not a one-time transformation, but rather, enacted by living into an ethics that ... is part of an ongoing struggle for liberation, healing, and right relationship across ecosystems and injustices.

Presence and Jeong
Relationality and Care as Resistance
By Kristine Chong

Every summer until I was 8 years old, I visited my grandparents at my mother’s hometown in Seoul, Corea. The most enduring memories of these visits are the quotidian moments of my grandmother and me squatting in the street corner near her yeontan (briquette)-heated house, surrounded by a group of her friends and local neighbors.

Connecting Spirituality
By Kristine Chong

I am not very good with structure. Perhaps it is a subtle resistance against the Confucian emphasis on order, but my preference for spontaneity started young and it did not bode well for my spiritual health as assessed by churches that prioritized spiritual disciplines.

From Helper to Guest
Confronting the Complex Nature of Privilege in Solidarity Work
By Kristine Chong

Ten years ago, I served as an AmeriCorps VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America) at a refugee resettlement office in San Diego. Begun in 1965 as a domestic counterpart to the Peace Corps, VISTA is a national service program that connects volunteers to anti-poverty organizations.