Model Minority Myth
Proximity to Whiteness is a Lie
The Role of Asian American Churches in Affirmative Action
By Jonathon Sun

Asian Americans have been brought to the forefront of the news because of Harvard’s Affirmative Action case and the Asian American community has been divided about how to approach the issue. Some groups argue that Asian Americans have been systematically discriminated against because of racial quotas.

Bear One Another’s Burdens
Racial Justice Solidarity as a Divine Calling
By Lisa Asedillo Pratt

When my mom and dad were dating, my Filipina mother told my white U.S.-American father that she would be returning to the Philippines to continue her work there after they graduated from seminary in California. She felt a strong calling to serve her people, and it would be up to him if he wanted to follow her there and continue their relationship.

The Struggles of Discussing Race in the Asian American Evangelical Church
By Paul Matsushima

In 2011, I found myself having to defend the argument that race still matters while attending one of the most ethnically diverse evangelical seminaries in the nation. Don’t get me wrong: Students and faculty alike openly discussed ethnic and cultural differences. And although all were unanimous that racism was bad and diversity was good, when it came to more explicit discussions of institutionalized racism or white supremacy, there tended to be choirs of crickets.

Confronting Violence in Postracial America
By Jude Paul Matias Dizon

The 2008 and 2016 elections exposed our nation’s drastically divergent views on the state of race relations in the United States. In the intervening eight years, some believed that our country’s racial progress had reached the telos of “post-racial” society and required no further action.

Where is the Asian American Church During Tumultuous Times?
By Kevin Pacifico Gonzaga

The Civil Rights Era was a tumultuous time for our society as many struggled for racial and social justice. While some Black Churches and some White Churches joined this movement, many Christians stood against the end of segregation and continued to provide theological backing for white supremacy.

Black Pain and Korean Empathy
Remembering Latasha Harlins and Building Bridges
By Christian Chin

I was in sixth grade when the killing of Latasha Harlins became national news. Latasha Harlins was a 15-year-old Black teenager who went to a Korean-owned liquor store in South Central, Los Angeles, to buy some orange juice.

The Model Minority Myth and the Wedge Between Black and White America [Updated]
And a Christianity Today podcast episode that perpetuates this thinking
By Kenji Kuramitsu

By now, many of us are at least casually acquainted with “the model minority myth” that Asian Americans are naturally (or “culturally”) hyper-disciplined, obedient, intelligent, and industrious. Good at math, capable doctors — bad at sports, nerdy at heart. Other people of color should “be more like them”.

Our Stories of Suffering
Rejecting the Silence of the Model Minority to Make Space for Lament
by Soong-Chan Rah

A FEW YEARS ago, a friend was working on a documentary on the immigrant story. He asked if he could tell parts of my childhood story of growing up in an inner-city neighborhood in Baltimore.