Anti-Blackness
Asians in Black riots
Join the Black movement
By Wong Tian An

The time is now. We cannot be caught sitting on the sidelines. Solidarity statements, while symbolically valuable, ultimately miss the point. The Black struggle is our struggle. Everything we have collectively learned about race and capitalism tells us our struggles are inextricably connected.

Minor Feelings and Racial Melancholia
Understanding Anti-Asian Racism Beyond COVID-19
By Bianca Mabute-Louie

While the media reports on and profits from interpersonal racist incidents that result from exogenous shocks, minor feelings and racial melancholia encompass the daily, interminable despondence of racism.

Why I Stopped Talking About Racial Reconciliation and Started Talking About White Supremacy
By Erna Kim Hackett

Recently, people have asked me, “Why isn’t talking about white privilege enough, why white supremacy?” There is an obvious discomfort with the term by white people. The one exception to that is when things like Charlottesville happen.

We Can't Hear You!
White Supremacy, White Complicity, and the Killing Fields They Create
By Pausa Kaio Thompson

When asked by a reporter in the aftermath of the Christchurch massacre: “Do you see, today, white nationalism as a rising threat around the world?” Donald Trump responded: “I don’t, really."

Yick Wo and the Good Samaritan
By Sandhya Jha

We owe a lot to Yick Wo. By we, I mean Asians living in the United States, whether we’re citizens or not. And by Yick Wo, I mean the man who went to jail for running a laundromat in a wooden building.

Bear One Another’s Burdens
Racial Justice Solidarity as a Divine Calling
By Lisa Asedillo Pratt

When my mom and dad were dating, my Filipina mother told my white U.S.-American father that she would be returning to the Philippines to continue her work there after they graduated from seminary in California. She felt a strong calling to serve her people, and it would be up to him if he wanted to follow her there and continue their relationship.

Prophet of Holy Shade and Salvation
Rest in Peace, Dr. Cone
By Kenji Kuramitsu

As a college student, I was a member of a fundamentalist, cultic strain of white evangelicalism that took pride in differentiating itself from the supposed “cultural baggage of Korean and black churches”. When I started to question some of our tradition’s toxic teachings around gender, race, and sexuality — violent, colonial relics that withered much of our ethics and discipleship — I was shunned from my community in a very painful and traumatic way. For years, I felt unsure of how I could possibly be a Christian again, and I was afraid to enter faith spaces, though I still felt a need for Jesus-shaped spiritual nourishment.

Naming the Violence of Charlottesville
The American Church Must Denounce White Supremacy
By Kevin Hu

The obelisk of General Robert E. Lee represents more than just a memorial; it represents the lingering presence of white supremacy in America. It represents the power structures that the Confederate Army was fighting for. Racial superiority based on genealogy. Racism normalized.

Confronting Violence in Postracial America
By Jude Paul Matias Dizon

The 2008 and 2016 elections exposed our nation’s drastically divergent views on the state of race relations in the United States. In the intervening eight years, some believed that our country’s racial progress had reached the telos of “post-racial” society and required no further action.

Black Pain and Korean Empathy
Remembering Latasha Harlins and Building Bridges
By Christian Chin

I was in sixth grade when the killing of Latasha Harlins became national news. Latasha Harlins was a 15-year-old Black teenager who went to a Korean-owned liquor store in South Central, Los Angeles, to buy some orange juice.

The Model Minority Myth and the Wedge Between Black and White America [Updated]
And a Christianity Today podcast episode that perpetuates this thinking
By Kenji Kuramitsu

By now, many of us are at least casually acquainted with “the model minority myth” that Asian Americans are naturally (or “culturally”) hyper-disciplined, obedient, intelligent, and industrious. Good at math, capable doctors — bad at sports, nerdy at heart. Other people of color should “be more like them”.